Reptilia School Programs

Reptilia has custom-written curriculums guided by the applicable education department overseeing the elementary science curriculum and approved by the school boards for which we teach. We use a multidisciplinary approach incorporating the concepts and guidelines set forth in the Science and Technology curriculum.

For more information and booking please contact us:
Vaughan: bookings.vaughan@reptilia.org | 905-761-6223
Whitby: bookings.whitby@reptilia.org | (905) 493-9537

School Curriculum Programs

The Characteristics of Living Things: How Do We Know It’s Alive?

Students learn about the characteristics of all living things. Specifically, that living things move, reproduce, consume energy, grow, and die. We explore these characteristics of life and the variation in these characteristics. For example, students learn about the many ways that animals move through their environment.

Key Concepts/Words:
Energy, food, growth, life cycle, movement, reproduction

Diversity… We Are All Different, Yet the Same

We may all look different, eat different foods, and even behave differently, but in the end, we are all people. Reptiles are no different. They may look different, eat different things, and even behave differently, but in many ways, they are just like us. This lesson explores diversity and the great variation we see in the world around us, while focusing on the things that we all have in common.

Key Concepts/Words:
Diversity, differences, similarities, animals, characteristics, empathy, stewardship, vertebrates, diet

Colors and Textures

We all know that snakes are scaly and not slimy, but did you know that they still all feel different? In this presentation, the children will experience a range of textures and colors, exploring the diversity of reptiles in a tactile way.

Key Concepts/Words:
Diversity, differences, similarities, colors, texture, rough, smooth, bumpy, hard, soft, senses

Using the Senses to Learn About Senses!

This lesson focuses on the five senses and how they help animals, including people, survive. Students learn about the fascinating variation in sensory abilities of different types of animals and they begin to learn about how senses are needed for survival. Best of all, students use their senses of sight, smell, touch, and hearing to learn about the animals we bring to your classroom (however, we hope none of the students taste the animals!).

Key Concepts/Words:
Senses, sense organs, sight, smell, taste, touch, hearing

The Characteristics of Living Things - How Do We Know It’s Alive?

Students learn about the characteristics of all living things. Specifically, that living things move, reproduce, consume energy, grow, and die. We explore these characteristics of life and the variation in these characteristics. For example, students learn about the many ways that animals move through their environment.

Key Concepts/Words:
Energy, food, growth, life cycle, movement, reproduction

Exploring the Needs of Living Things

This lesson focuses on the basic necessities of life: energy, water, shelter/space, and air. Students learn how animals meet these needs in their environment and how changes to the environments affect the survival of animals.

Key Concepts/Words:
Air, diet, energy, food, growth, pollution, senses, shelter/space, water

Ultimate Survivors: How Animals Adapt to Changes in Their Environment

The world can be a tough place to live in. All organisms must be able to respond and adapt to changes in their environment. Many species have specialized features and adaptations that help them to meet their needs. Animals respond to changes in temperature, water availability, food availability and more. Students learn how different vertebrates respond and adapt to these seasonal changes as well as how different characteristics help various vertebrates survive and even thrive in their environments.

Key Concepts/Words:
Amphibians, birds, ectothermic/endothermic, fish, food, mammals, reptiles, temperature, water, adaptation, seasons, migration

Life Goes On… and On: Animal Life Cycles – Birth, Growth, Reproduction, and Parental Care

Just as there is variation in the appearance of vertebrates, there is variation in the life cycles of vertebrates. This lesson focuses on the life cycles of vertebrates and introduces students to the many different ways animals are born, grow, reproduce, and care for their young.

Key Concepts/Words:
Amphibians, bird, birth, fish, growth, mammals, parental care, reptiles, reproduction

Vertebrate Variety: Exploring the Characteristics of Vertebrates

Students learn all about the five classes of vertebrates and compare their characteristics. Reptilia’s staff describe the physical characteristics, behavioral characteristics, and life cycle characteristics of reptiles and amphibians and compare them to birds, mammals, and fish.

Key Concepts/Words:
Amphibians, birds, ectothermic/endothermic, fish, life cycle, mammals, reproduction, reptiles, vertebrates

The World Around Us: Living and Surviving

This lesson combines the other three lessons, touching on how various vertebrates live and survive in their environment, using their senses and other adaptations to find food, avoid predators, and meet their needs, as well as looking at how their life cycles suit their lifestyles.

Key Concepts/Words:
Amphibians, Bird, birth, fish, growth, mammals, parental care, reptiles, reproduction, characteristics, senses, adaptation

Plant & Animal Interactions

The natural world is a strange and wonderful place where all living things are intricately linked to each other. The interaction and interdependence between plants and animals is an excellent way to introduce the concept of interconnectedness to students. This lesson helps students to identify the similarities between plants and animals and it introduces them to the interactions between these two types of organisms.

Key Concepts/Words:
Energy, food, interaction, growth, life cycle, movement, pollination, reproduction

Ultimate Survivors: How Animals Adapt to Changes in Their Environment

The world can be a tough place to live in. All organisms must be able to respond and adapt to changes in their environment. Many species have specialized features and adaptations that help them to meet their needs. Animals respond to changes in temperature, water availability, food availability and more. Students learn how different vertebrates respond and adapt to these seasonal changes as well as how different characteristics help various vertebrates survive and even thrive in their environments.

Key Concepts/Words:
Amphibians, birds, ectothermic/endothermic, fish, food, mammals, reptiles, temperature, water, adaptation, seasons, migration

Life Goes On… and On: Animal Life Cycles – Birth, Growth, Reproduction, and Parental Care

Just as there is variation in the appearance of vertebrates, there is variation in the life cycles of vertebrates. This lesson focuses on the life cycles of vertebrates and introduces students to the many different ways animals are born, grow, reproduce, and care for their young.

Key Concepts/Words:
Amphibians, bird, birth, fish, growth, mammals, parental care, reptiles, reproduction

Vertebrate Variety: Exploring the Characteristics of Vertebrates

Students learn all about the five classes of vertebrates and compare their characteristics. Reptilia’s staff describe the physical characteristics, behavioral characteristics, and life cycle characteristics of reptiles and amphibians and compare them to birds, mammals, and fish.

Key Concepts/Words:
Amphibians, birds, ectothermic/endothermic, fish, life cycle, mammals, reproduction, reptiles, vertebrates

The World Around Us: Living and Surviving

This lesson combines the other three lessons, touching on how various vertebrates live and survive in their environment, using their senses and other adaptations to find food, avoid predators, and meet their needs, as well as looking at how their life cycles suit their lifestyles.

Key Concepts/Words:
Amphibians, Bird, birth, fish, growth, mammals, parental care, reptiles, reproduction, characteristics, senses, adaptation

Organ Organization and Integration

How do the organs of other organisms work compared to ours? How are organ systems integrated to perform as one unit to sustain life? These are some of the questions explored in this lesson. Our lesson is a tour of the organ systems found in all terrestrial vertebrates highlighting variation in the structure and function of the major organs and systems. Students gain a better understanding of the way these systems work together.

Key Concepts/Words:
Circulatory system, digestive system, muscular system, musculoskeletal system, nervous system, food, respiratory system, system integration

Classic Classification: How We Organize The Living World

Scientists classify organisms according to a specific guideline established by Carl Linnaeus, a Swedish biologist who lived in the 1700’s. This classification system is used to organize species into workable groups of living things that are similar in many ways. This lesson focuses on biodiversity, the methods of classification and the characteristics of animals in the five vertebrate classes.

Key Concepts/Words:
Amphibians, birds, characteristics, classification, ectothermic, endothermic, fish, fossil, invertebrate, mammals, reptiles, vertebrate

Ecological Essentials: The Delicate Balance

The diversity of animals and ecosystems in which they live is astounding; however, the basic elements of these ecosystems remain the same and the natural laws that dictate the interactions within the system are predictable. This lesson focuses on the basic concept of ecology and introduces students to the idea of ecological interactions.

Key Concepts/Words:
Abiotic, biotic, community, competition, energy, food web, niche, population, predator, prey, space, shelter, water

Humans and Ecosystems: How Do We Fit In?

Humans do not operate outside the laws of nature. The laws that govern ecological processes apply to our activities. This lesson focuses on the links between our actions and the health of ecosystems. Students apply their basic knowledge of ecosystems to better understand the role of the human population in ecological processes.

Key Concepts/Words:
Air, conservation, endangered, ecosystems, energy, extinction, food web, habitat loss, interaction, pollution, technology, water

Does your class require accommodations?

No Problem!

Our Facilities are fully accessible, and we can customize lessons and experience to suit the needs of your classroom.

Not sure how your class will respond?

Don't worry!

Our Educators are experts in delivering interactive experiences. They know how to make a curriculum fun for everyone!

Won't the reptiles distract the class?

Of course not!

Our reptiles are a real-life, visual learning method that our educators use to connect students to the educational experience.

Reptilia Field Trip

Visit the Jungle!

$10.25 /Student Minimum 20 students

Additional Students: $10.25 +Tax/Student
Teachers: 1 Free for every 5 Student

Includes
A 30-minute zoo tour for your entire class;
An exclusive 60-minute curriculum-based lesson;
All day admission to the Facility!

Taxes apply.

Elementary School Visit

60 minute lessons for grades K - 8

Starting at $225 Maximum 30 Students per Lesson

1 x 60 minute Lesson: $225
2 x 60 minute Lessons: $320
3 x 60 minute Lessons: $410
4 x 60 minute Lessons: $495
5 x 60 minute Lessons: $575

+Mileage: $0.40/Km – Roundtrip

Taxes apply.

High School Visit

60 minute lessons for grades 9 -12

Starting at $250 Maximum 30 Students per Lesson

1 x 60 minute Lesson: $250
2 x 60 minute Lessons: $335
3 x 60 minute Lessons: $435
4 x 60 minute Lessons: $510
5 x 60 minute Lessons: $600

+Mileage: $0.40/Km – Roundtrip

Taxes apply.

Ready to book your field trip or school visit, or still have questions?

Our booking team is always ready to help! Give us a call or email us:

Vaughan
bookings.vaughan@reptilia.org
905-761-6223

Whitby
bookings.whitby@reptilia.org
(905) 493-9537